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Online dating scams china

Beware: 10 Scams in China To Watch Out For,Post navigation

ChinaBounder · 4y This scam is nothing new and it happens to Chinese men too. The red flag isn't that she brought a friend without warning you- they all do that. It's that she wants to  · Here are some of the most common online dating scams we’ve found in our research and how to avoid them. Once you’re in the know, the power is in your hands. 1. They Missing: china We advise you conduct appropriate due diligence on all of your China business projects. On this page. Common traits of scams. The “come to China” scam. The “representative” scam. The ... read more

Please come to China to discuss with us further and sign our contract as soon as possible. We look forward to seeing you! Once the money has been paid, the Chinese company disappears without a trace. A Canadian company may receive an unsolicited email from a Chinese company which, it turns out, is actually not based in China. The company is seeking Canada-based representatives to establish a business presence in Canada, and more importantly, to transfer payments from Canadian or U.

In exchange, the Chinese company promises five to ten percent of the payments as a commission. These cases are invariably fraudulent and should be regarded with appropriate caution. For tax reasons, we would like you to pay in a different account than our usual one. Many thanks!

Sometimes a Canadian company may be asked by their legitimate and long-standing Chinese business partner to make a payment to a different bank account than the one normally used. Different reasons could be given to explain this unusual request: taxes, government loans, the need to secure foreign funds outside China, etc. After the money transfer, the Chinese company denies that any payment has been made.

In many cases, the Chinese company truthfully did not receive the payment, but it has in fact been diverted elsewhere. Before making a payment to an unfamiliar bank account, confirm with someone with supervisory authority from the Chinese company that the payment request is valid with a detailed explanation.

Given the insecure nature of most email services, use the phone! We would like to warn you that someone is trying to register your trademark in China. Please contact us as soon as possible to protect your intellectual property. But still nice to know, so I can watch out for scammers here in the states and online. Recently I met a Chinese lady in Tinder. She seems to be nice and we chatted for quite some time almost 1 week.

She seems very genuine, telling about her life, what she do, her struggles.. She send picture of herself and say we both get along well. She said her cousin are financial expert and the one that give the tip to her. I find it bit odd but I believe at first. Now after 1 week of nice chatting, the critical point question came in. She said since she making so much, she can help me.

I am typically very careful with all these things, especially when it comes to money. What I am so sad was that I thought I would have a nice lady as a friend or maybe more but my defense instinct kicks in pretty quick when she mention about the investment.

I am sad cos I invested my time to chat with her not knowing is all a SCAM! One of my nephews was applying to China for further studies and guy name Lee W. Yong was contacted. He promised that he can get him in to well reputed university, Peking University, with monthly stipends and scholarship. He had put his advertising in WeChat. He called his company China Student Consulting.

Then he starts to demand money for the process. Once they sent him all the demanded fee, he started to beg for more. He said the customs office is asking money to send the documents. You could tell that he was lying. He would argue that everything is ready to ship and waiting for demanded extra money.

So far he took RMB. And when his parent admanantly asked for proof, he blocked them in WeChat account. Your email address will not be published. But what is it? Jin Luo explains. I t was a sleepless night for many Chinese people when U. House Speaker Pelosi flew to Taiwan on August 2nd of A new Chinese word created in recent years, cuànfǎng 窜访 appeared in the official statement that was issued by the Chinese Foreign Ministry at 11 pm that night, and subsequently it appeared all over social media.

What is this word lost in translation, and why did people suddenly get nostalgic over an old romantic song? Here is the original wording in Chinese and the official translation to English from the statement of the Chinese Foreign Ministry on the evening on 2 August:. Cuànfǎng is actually a compound word: cuàn 窜 refers to fleeing, escaping, hiding, or running away; fǎng 访 refers to inquiring, seeking, or visiting.

Cuan as a compound character Sohu. To make matters more complicated, cuàn 窜 by itself is also a compound character.

The mouse or rat is an animal that is more often associated with negative things in Chinese culture. They are often considered sneaky, dirty, running around everywhere, and able to reproduce quickly. Although it is a relatively new word, cuànfǎng already existed before the Pelosi incident and was not created in light of this controversial visit. You went somewhere where you were not supposed to go; 2. The visit was not accepted or welcomed by the Chinese government; 3.

Cuàn was mainly meant to add an emotional aspect to the term and shows the contempt of the person who uses it. Image via Wainao. Since cuàn has the meaning of fleeing, it is especially suitable when referring to political dissidents who went into exile overseas.

Since then, it has been used again for further visits of the Dalai Lama to other countries US , Mongolia , as well as for Rebiya Kadeer , Lee Teng-hui , Shinzo Abe , Joshua Wong , and others.

Some say it is because of the mere difficulty to translate this word, while others say it is the routine sanitization of English translations by the Foreign Ministry. David Gitter, president of the Center for Advanced China Research based in Washington D. At this point, it remains up for debate whether this is a linguistic constraint or a political choice. While the term cuànfǎng has been widely used in official discourse, it has also become a popular online word.

Chinese netizens were watching the entire event unfold with mixed feelings — on the one hand, there was a strong sense of patriotism and anger, on the other hand, the massive attention to the event also turned it into something that was almost as exciting as a celebrity drama. Back in the previous century, Hong Kong singer Leon Lai expressed the emotions of someone waiting for his lover to arrive in this melodic song, singing:.

Later, some were unable to play the song anymore, although it remains unclear if this was due to geographic restrictions or because the song was actually taken offline by censors. All jokes and cuànfǎng references aside, Pelosi did end up realizing that visit, and its aftermath, including a second Taiwan visit by a U.

congressional delegation, has had a substantial impact on U. Will there be more cuànfǎng to Taiwan? By Jin Luo. Follow whatsonweibo. Featured image by Alexa from Pixabay. Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us. First-time commenters, please be patient — we will have to manually approve your comment before it appears.

The stories of Liu Xuezhou and the Xuzhou mother both developed in real-time while netizens pushed them to the front page, making them too big for state media to ignore. It only takes a spark to start a wildfire.

Manya Koetse erklärt das chinesische Internet. I t was December 6th of when a teenage boy posted a short video on Chinese social media. With a straight back, clear voice, and serious face, he looked directly into the camera and said:. I was born in between and and around the age of three months old, I was bought by my parents, my adoptive parents, in Datong in Shanxi.

I am healthy. At the age of four, my adoptive parents passed away due to an accident. I am now living in Nangong, Xingtai, in Hebei Province. I study in Shijiazhuang. I hope you can help me spread my message so that those who suspect they might be my parents can see it. This video would be the start of a story followed by millions of Chinese netizens. It is the story of Liu Xuezhou 刘学州.

Why did the tragic story of one teenage boy capture the entire nation? There are multiple reasons. By posting his call for help in finding his biological parents, Liu involved Chinese netizens in his journey from the start, allowing them to follow his story in real-time through his social media and news reports. In interviews, he said that his story did not define him and that he was determined to make something of his life. Since , the young Liu was working to earn money while also going to school.

His plan was to be admitted to university. Liu Xuezhou, picture posted on his Weibo account. After his adoptive parents died in a firework explosion, Liu was raised by his grandparents and was sent to boarding school. Being so young without parents, he was a target of school bullies and had to change schools at least four times until, by grade six, he had finally found a school where he could thrive. By late , as a something-year-old, Liu felt it was time to get some answers and find his biological parents.

How did he end up being adopted? Was he abducted? Were his parents still out there searching for him? Through his own efforts — sped up by finding his vaccination records — and with some help of the police, Liu was able to trace down his biological parents. After DNA tests confirmed that they were in fact his biological parents, Liu was ready to meet them. But what was supposed to be a happy reunion turned out to be a bitter disappointment. Liu soon learned that he had not been abducted as a child, but that he had been sold on purpose by his father.

They married and had another son, but then ended up divorcing. In this letter, Liu said that besides being sold as a child and becoming an orphan at the age of four, he was also severely bullied by classmates and molested by a teacher at school. His aunt, whom he loved as a mother, also left him behind after she moved away due to a broken marriage. As he spiraled into depression, Liu felt a spark of hope when he saw the news about Sun Zhuo 孙卓 , whose story became one of the major trending news stories of In , when Sun was only four, he was stolen off the street by a human trafficker.

His biological parents never gave up hope they would find their son again and sacrificed everything to be able to fund their search efforts. The Chinese film Dearest 亲爱的 was partly based on their story. After a years-long search, Sun was found in due to the help of authorities and face recognition technology that helped trace the person suspected of abducting him.

In an unexpected twist, Sun stated that he would prefer to stay with his adoptive parents, who had raised him for a decade. Image of the reunion of Sun Zhuo with his parents, who never stopped searching for him image via Sohu.

Liu described how his biological father did not seem happy when Liu first contacted him, and seemed reluctant to meet. His biological father eventually did come to see him, but their communication afterward was not smooth.

Liu and his biological father on December 26, His mother also was not elated that her biological son had found his way back to her. Liu felt unwanted, again, and was also searching for a home to live and was not sure who to turn to anymore. After he asked his biological father for help in buying or renting a place to live, he was blocked on WeChat. Liu then decided to take his parents to court. Sharing screenshots on social media of the developments between him and his parents, Liu was condemned and bullied by netizens, who accused him of only wanting to find his biological parents for financial gains.

It was all too much for the teenage boy. In his farewell letter, he expressed the hope that the traffickers and biological parents would be punished for their deeds. Liu was later found to have committed suicide at a beach in the city of Sanya, and could no longer be rescued.

Liu passed away within a month after meeting his biological parents at the age of just 15 years old. China Digital Times recently described how on the Weibo page of Dr.

Li Wenliang, one of the doctors who raised the alarm about the coronavirus outbreak, many people also mention Liu Xuezhou. Illustration that went viral on social media at the time of Dr. Over the past two years, Dr. Li, tell about their own anxieties and worries, but also address social injustices.

As recorded by China Digital Times, one among thousands of comments said:. If you happen to see Liu Xuezhou, please be good to him. Looking at Dr. But who is she? The video, filmed by a local vlogger in the village of Huankou in Xuzhou, showed how the woman was kept in a dirty hut without a door in the freezing cold.

She did not even wear a coat, and she seemed confused and unable to express herself. To give the full story, here is the original video that caused the social media storm, which is still ongoing today tw distressing content, not sure why the lock is blurred, as if that is the most shocking thing about this video.. The video caused a storm on social media. Why was she chained up?

Was she a victim of human trafficking? Was she being abused? How could she have had eight babies? Was she forced to have so many children? While netizens were speculating about the case and venting their anger, Weibo shut down some of the hashtags dedicated to this topic, but the topic soon popped up everywhere, and people started making artworks and writing essays in light of the case.

Following public demands, local authorities started looking into the case. An initial statement by Feng County, where the village of Huankou is located, was issued on January 28 and it said that the woman, named Yang 杨 , married her husband in and that there was no indication that she was a victim of human trafficking.

The woman was dealing with mental problems and would display sudden violent outbursts, beating children and older people. The family allegedly thought it was best to separate her from the family home during these episodes, letting her stay chained up in a small hut next to the house. The first statement raised more questions than it answered and more people, including influential Weibo bloggers and media insiders, started investigating the case.

Meanwhile, it became clear that husband Dong Zhimin was giving interviews to other vloggers flocking to Huankou.

This only led to more online anger about Dong exploiting his wife and children. Screenshots from the original Douyin TikTok video. As the social media storm intensified, more official statements ensued. The statement said that Yang had been diagnosed with schizophrenia and was now receiving treatment. A third, fourth, and even fifth statement issued by authorities on February 7th, 10th, and 23rd confirmed what many on Weibo had suspected all along, namely that Yang had indeed been a victim of human trafficking.

Yang was identified as Xiaohuamei 小花梅 , born and raised in Yagu. According to the statements, Xiaohuamei married and moved to another city in , but she divorced and returned to her village two years later, which is when she allegedly also showed signs of mental illness. Her parents, now deceased, then allegedly ordered a female fellow villager to take their daughter to Jiangsu to get married there.

The woman never reported her as missing to the police and she never notified the family. That woman, along with another man and Dong Zhimin, are now held criminally responsible for illegal detainment and human trafficking. Though Xiaohuamei managed to escape, she was sold twice again, eventually ending up with the Dong family. One of the many images shared on Chinese social media to raise awareness of the case of the Xuzhou mother and other women like her.

Over the past few weeks, the stories of other women who also might be a victim of human trafficking have surfaced, and the public outcry demanding justice for trafficked women is ongoing.

Both stories developed in real-time while netizens were following the case, both stories eventually became too big for Chinese state media to ignore, and both Liu and Yang highlighted bigger social issues in contemporary China, mainly those relating to human trafficking.

The trafficking of especially women and children has various purposes, including forced marriage and illegal adoption in areas where there is a shortage of women along with a preference for baby boys. China Daily recently reported that lawmakers and advisers are now pushing for heavier punishment for human trafficking crimes, suggesting that the current penalties imposed on the buyers of women and children are too weak; the maximum prison sentence for those who purchase abducted women and children is three years.

In the case of the Xuzhou mother, there has been online censorship but the ongoing intense public outrage eventually did lead to higher-level research into the case. The mother was rescued from her terrible situation, the human traffickers involved are being held responsible, and so are 17 officials, who will be punished by authorities for their wrongdoings in the case. As for Liu Xuezhou, his adoptive family members have recently filed a request at the Sanya Public Security Bureau to launch another investigation into his case.

Their request was accepted on February 23rd, with multiple people being suspected of criminal offenses, eventually leading to his death. According to Dr. In light of these recent stories, the public is happy that actions have been taken, but they are not satisfied with how these cases were handled. Many argue that authorities have failed in being transparent, that local governments have not done enough to prevent these cases from happening, and that China should do more to put an end to human trafficking.

And so, they are still posting the stories of children like Liu and women like Xiaohuamei to keep raising awareness and to keep pressuring local authorities and lawmakers to take more action to eradicate these practices.

As Liu is no longer alive and Xiaohuamei, still hospitalized, cannot defend herself, Chinese netizens keep raising their voices for them. In doing so, they have not just impacted how authorities dealt with these specific cases, but they are also changing how cases such as these will be handled in the future. In the meantime, online posts, videos, and artworks honor both Liu and Xiaohuamei, so that their stories will not be forgotten. It should have been us, the adults, taking care of these things for you.

You please go and rest now, we will finish the rest for you. By Manya Koetse Follow whatsonweibo. For information and support on mental health and suicide, international helplines can be found at www. This text was written for Goethe-Institut China under a CC-BY-NC-ND Connect with us.

While the China market offers many business opportunities, scammers preying on unsuspecting business persons is a reality. Bear in mind that an out-of-the-blue deal from an unknown Chinese entity may not always be as it appears. This page contains scenarios frequently reported to the Canadian Trade Commissioner Service in China. We advise you conduct appropriate due diligence on all of your China business projects.

Please come to China to discuss with us further and sign our contract as soon as possible. We look forward to seeing you! Once the money has been paid, the Chinese company disappears without a trace. A Canadian company may receive an unsolicited email from a Chinese company which, it turns out, is actually not based in China.

The company is seeking Canada-based representatives to establish a business presence in Canada, and more importantly, to transfer payments from Canadian or U. In exchange, the Chinese company promises five to ten percent of the payments as a commission. These cases are invariably fraudulent and should be regarded with appropriate caution.

For tax reasons, we would like you to pay in a different account than our usual one. Many thanks! Sometimes a Canadian company may be asked by their legitimate and long-standing Chinese business partner to make a payment to a different bank account than the one normally used.

Different reasons could be given to explain this unusual request: taxes, government loans, the need to secure foreign funds outside China, etc. After the money transfer, the Chinese company denies that any payment has been made. In many cases, the Chinese company truthfully did not receive the payment, but it has in fact been diverted elsewhere. Before making a payment to an unfamiliar bank account, confirm with someone with supervisory authority from the Chinese company that the payment request is valid with a detailed explanation.

Given the insecure nature of most email services, use the phone! We would like to warn you that someone is trying to register your trademark in China. Please contact us as soon as possible to protect your intellectual property. Chinese entities may pretend to be legitimate legal or due diligence firms, trademark, copyright, domain registration or patent agents, freight forwarders, etc. There are many variations of this scam. One of the more sophisticated scams even involves non-Chinese individuals acting as employees of the fake Chinese company.

To properly protect your trademark, register it with legitimate local law firm or trademark agent. Our company is one of the largest in China and we have excellent relations with the local government officials as well as many potential clients. In order to secure lucrative contracts, some Chinese companies, often distributors, boast that they are industry leaders with great networks of potential clients or government contacts.

In most cases, these companies actually exist and basic due diligence will confirm that they are legitimate. The company may operate in a legally grey area. Sales of product through orders or agreements should be insured through Export Development Canada or via letters of credit from financial institutions, both of whom check out firms via their Chinese banking channels. The Government of Canada cannot intervene in private disputes that are strictly commercial in nature.

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Top 12 Best Chinese Dating Sites in 2022,Translation Agency Scam

 · Here are some of the most common online dating scams we’ve found in our research and how to avoid them. Once you’re in the know, the power is in your hands. 1. They Missing: china We advise you conduct appropriate due diligence on all of your China business projects. On this page. Common traits of scams. The “come to China” scam. The “representative” scam. The ChinaBounder · 4y This scam is nothing new and it happens to Chinese men too. The red flag isn't that she brought a friend without warning you- they all do that. It's that she wants to ... read more

He advised that he had been chatting online with his girlfriend for a few years, but that she had traveled to a certain city in China She did not speak Chinese and was now being held hostage by unknown Subjects in this city. He stays in a hotel for a week before returning to his home country. In this article, we will discuss dating scams — how to recognize them; how to check for them and what to do if you find out you are a victim of a dating scam. The first statement raised more questions than it answered and more people, including influential Weibo bloggers and media insiders, started investigating the case. It only takes a spark to start a wildfire. Some may even lure you into investing in something. Young Chinese Woman Dies at Haidilao Hotpot Restaurant.

A new study of the largest online dating site in China reveals hundreds of thousands online dating scams china con artists. The WeChat Group Scam WeChat in Chinese: Weixin is the most popular app in China. by Chelsea King. Liu soon learned that he had not been abducted as a child, online dating scams china, but that he had been sold on purpose by his father. You will surely lose face if these things happen. Some say it is because of the mere difficulty to translate this word, while others say it is the routine sanitization of English translations by the Foreign Ministry. Many argue that authorities have failed in being transparent, that local governments have not done enough to prevent these cases from happening, and that China should do more to put an end to human trafficking.

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